Sunday, April 10, 2016

May 14 - The Man Who Stalked Einstein

The Man Who Stalked Einstein:
A Tale of Scientific Differences, Envy, and Ethnic Prejudice

Presented by Bruce J. Hillman, MD



The Man Who Stalked Einstein details the antagonistic relationship between Philipp Lenard – the 1905 Nobel Prize winner for physics – and Time Magazine’s ‘Man of the 20th Century,’ Albert Einstein. The two men were antipodes in nearly every regard. Lenard was an experimentalist, who believed the theoretical physics of Einstein was calculated charlatanry. He was a strident German nationalist, whose personal financial reversals and the death of his son led him to believe the popular Nazi shibboleth that the Jews were at fault for Germany’s problems. Lenard personalized Einstein as ‘the Jew.’ Over time, his writings and speeches attacking Einstein reversed the public’s perception of the once popular Einstein and had much to do with Einstein’s fleeing Europe in 1933. Following Hitler’s consolidation of authority, Lenard and his protégé, Johannes Stark - empowered by newly enacted anti-Semitic laws – led the dismissal of all Jewish scientists from German universities.

 
Bruce J. Hillman, MD, is Professor and former Chair of the Department of Radiology at the University of Virginia.  He has published more than 300 articles in the medical literature, as well as the 2010 book, The Sorcerer’s Apprentice – How Medical Imaging is Changing Health Care, explaining medical imaging for a lay audience. He has edited three medical journals, including his current role as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American College of Radiology. The Man Who Stalked Einstein: How Nazi Scientist Phillip Lenard Changed the Course of History is his first work of creative non-fiction.




Saturday, May 14, 2016
1:30 pm

Twinbrook Library (Note New Location)
202 Meadow Hall Dr, Rockville, MD

Friday, April 08, 2016

Shadow of a Doubt - April 2016

The Monthly Calendar of the National Capital Area Skeptics
    • April 9 Lecture: Technical Studies of Cultural Heritage: The Artist as Alchemist presented by Lynn Brostoff, PhD
    • May 3 - Philip J. Klass Award dinner 
    • May 2016 lecture
    • Torn from today's headlines
    • NCAS Elections
    • Amazon Smile: Contribute to NCAS at no cost to you
    • Shadow Light
    • Drinking Skeptically on hiatus
      NCAS Public Lecture Series

      Technical Studies of Cultural Heritage: 
      The Artist as Alchemist

      Lynn Brostoff, PhD
      Preservation Directorate
      Library of Congress

      Saturday, April 9, 2:00pm - 4:00pm
      SPECIAL TIME
      Bethesda Regional Library
      7400 Arlington Road
      Bethesda, MD [map] [directions]
      (Bethesda Metro station)
      FREE admission – Everyone welcome, members and non-members

      Lynn Brostoff, PhD, a conservation scientist in the Preservation Directorate at the Library of Congress, will discuss the analysis of museum collections and the alchemical origin of many artists' materials.

      Lynn Brostoff received a master's degree in polymer materials science from the University of Cincinnati and master's in art history (and certificate in conservation) from New York University. She also holds a PhD in chemistry from the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands. She has worked at the Smithsonian Institution's Museum Conservation Institute and the National Gallery of Art.

      Refreshments and socializing after the talk.

      http://www.ncas.org/2016/03/april-9-technical-studies-of-cultural.html

      Tuesday, March 22, 2016

      April 9 - Technical Studies of Cultural Heritage: The Artist as Alchemist

      Presented by
      Lynn Brostoff, PhD
      Preservation Directorate
      Library of Congress


      Lynn Brostoff, PhD, a conservation scientist in the Preservation Directorate at the Library of Congress, will discuss the analysis of museum collections and the alchemical origin of many
      artists’ materials.

      Lynn Brostoff received a master’s degree in polymer materials science from the University of Cincinnati and master’s in art history (and certificate in conservation) from New York University. She also holds a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands. She has worked at the Smithsonian Institution's Museum Conservation Institute and the National Gallery of Art.





      Saturday, April 9, 2016
      2:00 pm (Note special start time)
      Bethesda Regional Library
      7400 Arlington Rd
      Bethesda, MD


      FREE admission – Everyone welcome, members and non-members

      Refreshments and socializing after the talk.

      For more information, call the 24-hour Skeptic Line at 240-670-NCAS (6227).

      Thursday, March 17, 2016

      Shadow of a Doubt - March 2016

      The Monthly Calendar of the National Capital Area Skeptics
        • March 19 Lecture: Reproducibility of Scientific Findings: Barriers and Solutions presented by April Clyburne-Sherin, MSc
        • NCAS Lecture
        • Save the date: May 3 - Philip J. Klass Award dinner
        • Concept Presented in NCAS Lecture Wins Awards at High-Level US Government Briefing
        • NCAS Elections
        • Amazon Smile: Contribute to NCAS at no cost to you
        • Shadow Light
        • Drinking Skeptically on hiatus
          NCAS Public Lecture Series

          March 19, 2016 - 1:30pm - 4:00pm

          Reproducibility of Scientific Findings:
          Barriers and Solutions
          April Clyburne-Sherin, MSc
          Reproducible Research Evangelist
          Center for Open Science

          NEW LOCATION
          Chevy Chase Library
          Downstairs Meeting Room
          8005 Connecticut Ave
          Chevy Chase, MD
          FREE admission – Everyone welcome, members and non-members



          Science is a systematic method for accumulating knowledge with the reproducibility of a scientific finding as the highest standard of evaluating scientific evidence. Scientists do not work in isolation but build upon the research of others to incrementally advance human knowledge. However, attempts to reproduce published scientific findings are failing at high rates across many scientific disciplines. Individual scientists now must face two questions: (1) are my findings reproducible?; and (2) do I really know what I thought I knew based on the published findings in my field? The scientific community has to face two larger questions: (1) what is going on?;  (2) how do we fix it?

          Monday, February 15, 2016