Sunday, April 15, 2018

April 21 - Understanding Eyewitness Evidence and Confession Evidence in Criminal Cases: A Sensitive Skeptic’s Guide

Presented by Martin A. Safer, PhD,
Emeritus Professor of Psychology,
The Catholic University of America 



Inaccurate eyewitness testimony and false confessions are two of the most common reasons for wrongful convictions in criminal cases.  Using an actual case, Dr. Safer will illustrate why eyewitnesses may be inaccurate.  However, it is wrong to presume that all eyewitness testimony is unreliable.  Dr. Safer will present research on how to improve the quality of eyewitness evidence.  Legal professionals around the world, as well as ordinary citizens, are relatively unaware of both the flaws and potential strengths of eyewitness evidence.  Dr. Safer will describe the Interview-Identification-Eyewitness Factors (I-I-Eye) educational aid which helps sensitize individuals to judge more appropriately what is likely to be accurate versus inaccurate eyewitness evidence.

Dr. Safer will also present research regarding confession evidence in criminal cases and will describe the Before-During-After educational aid for assessing the quality of confession evidence. It is hoped that learning about these educational aids will help audience members become more sensitive skeptics about good versus poor quality eyewitness and confession evidence.

Professor Safer is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the Catholic University of America, where he taught for more than 35 years. He has more than 70 peer-reviewed publications, primarily in the areas of emotions and memory, including publications on eyewitness evidence and confession evidence. He has also served as an expert consultant on eyewitness evidence in criminal cases.

Saturday, April 21, 2018
1:30 pm

B-CC Regional Services Center
4805 Edgemoor Lane
2nd Floor (West Room)
Bethesda, MD

Directions: http://tinyurl.com/bcccenter

 FREE admission – Everyone welcome, members and non-members

Wednesday, April 04, 2018

April Science Events in Washington

There are two science events taking place in Washington DC that may be of interest to skeptics. No official events are being scheduled by NCAS in coordination with these, but NCAS members may wish to participate.

USA Science and Engineering Festival

Free Expo: Walter E. Washington Convention Center,
Washington D.C.
April 7-8, 2018


For complete information and to register, go to usasciencefestival.org. Note that you must preregister in order to be admitted. Registration is free, but they do request a $5 donation to defray the cost of registering.

From the USA Science and Engineering Festival website:


Mark your calendars for the 5th USA Science & Engineering Festival Expo on April 7-8, 2018! Explore 3,000 hands-on exhibits from the world’s leading scientific and engineering societies, universities, government agencies, high-tech corporations and STEM organizations. The two-day Expo is perfect for children, teens, and families who want to inspire their curious minds.

Where: Walter E. Washington Convention Center

When: Saturday 10 am- 6 pm and Sunday 10 am- 4 pm 

Join 350K+ attendees to celebrate science at the Expo and engage in activities with some of the biggest names in STEM. Hear stories of inspiration and courage, participate in mind-boggling experiments and rock out to science during our incredible stage shows.


March 4 Science


From the March for Science website:

On April 14, 2018 SCIENCE MARCHES ON
From Washington D.C. to Abuja, Nigeria, science supporters across the globe are mobilizing.  Events range from science expos and festivals to rallies and large-scale marches but they are united with shared goals.  March for Science events energize science advocates from multiple spheres to create tangible change and call for greater accountability of public officials to enact evidence-based policy that serves all communities. 

Joining us in Washington DC?  Find details here!
 
More than 200 satellite events around the world have also registered to participate in the 2nd annual event.  Check out the details at MarchForScience.org.